Drivel deluxe


There is a handy rule of thumb that one should always apply when parsing any tech "news" that appears in the Globe and Mail - to wit, the article in question is guaranteed to be (a) three months out of date, (b) badly misinformed, or (c) all of the above.

There is a handy rule of thumb that one should always apply when parsing any tech "news" that appears in the Globe and Mail - to wit, the article in question is guaranteed to be either (a) three months out of date, (b) badly misinformed, or (c) all of the above.

Case in point: striking long after the iron has gone icy cold, the Goat and Snail pumps out a fluffy-yet-laughable piece on Firefox . Strange timing on that, since the paper moved to Firefox as it's off-site solution for email and remote access about 6 months ago - the I.T. staff at the Globe being hip and together, in exactly the same way that the writers are not. As near as anyone can tell, the timing can only be explained by the fact that not only are the Globe's tech writers completely clueless regarding the subjects they blather about, but that they also don't even bother to pay attention to what their own I.T. department is doing. Memos, anyone?

Half regurgitated press release and half an attempt not to offend Microsoft, the story would be completely forgettable (like most of the content of the Globe) if not for the bizarre final paragraph: "It also can't do much with pages that require features only Internet Explorer has, such as the ability to run Active-X programs. These features are part of the reason IE is so riddled with malware, but they also allow it to interact with certain websites. Until Firefox finds a way around that, you might have to keep Internet Explorer around -- just for emergencies, of course." The analogy here would be a travel article about water filters that said something like "The new ZucchiniCo water filter removes 100 percent of pathogens in drinking water, but this means that you won't be able to catch the Ebola and E. Coli that is a part of the local experience in some countries. Until ZucchiniCo finds a way around this, you may want to drink the water in those countries directly from the source -- just for emergencies, of course."

The mind, as they say, boggles.

Posted: Sat - January 15, 2005 at 02:24 PM        


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